Who on your team or in your organization has the power to say "yes"? When a final call is needed, a decision must be made, is your organization made up of people or managers who have the ability to say "yes" or are they more likely (and expected) to say "no"?...

Who on your team or in your organization has the power to say "yes"? When a final call is needed, a decision must be made, is your organization made up of people or managers who have the ability to say "yes" or are they more likely (and expected) to say "no"? If everyone is saying "no" as ideas, propositions, etc. get pushed upstream, when does anything ever have a chance to reach a "yes"?

If you need organizational change or forward progress, one of the most important things you can do is identify and empower people, teams, managers or directors to say "yes". Then it's your job to stay out of it, not micro manage that process, and definitely don't undermine it by countering every fledgling attempt at a yes with a CEO-like swift "NO".

Not only will the power of "yes" get you moving, it will force your team to own its mistakes, be less fearful of change, embrace new ideas (instead of shying away from them), and give them a much stronger sense of ownership within the organization. And for what it's worth, a sense of ownership from your team is more valuable than anything, and worth a few missteps along the way if it gets you there.

What do you think? Does your company or organization give you the power to say "yes"? Or are you expected to say "no"?

Share on Twitter or Facebook Published July 20th 2010