I'm not interested in feeling better. When I am at work, I am dealing with problems—my client's problems, my agency's problems, somebody's problem. I always joke that we aren't designers or programmers, rather we are problem solvers. When I meet with potential...

I'm not interested in feeling better. When I am at work, I am dealing with problems—my client's problems, my agency's problems, somebody's problem. I always joke that we aren't designers or programmers, rather we are problem solvers. When I meet with potential clients, they are meeting with us because they think we might be the ones to solve their problems. And, more importantly, we might show them some more problems they didn't even realize they had.

You know when you get too busy to get a hair cut and your hair just keeps getting worse and worse, until you get used to it? Same thing happens in business, in everything really. You get used to things. You don't smell the litter box; you aren't aware of your outdated wardrobe; your hair looks fine to you. This is when you count on a really close friend to have the nerve to tell you, "Hey friend, your hair looks horrible." While it might sting to hear it, you are thankful because now you can make a decision. Do I get a better hairdo, or am I okay with this horrible one? It's better to be empowered with the truth than live in denial. That saying "ignorance is bliss" is so very true.

So, when a client hires my company, or we hire another company, I don't want lip service; I want the cold hard truth. Chances are, I can't see the immediate problems I am faced with, as I have become used to them. And, even if I can see some, I should assume I can't see them all.

While I may seek blissful ignorance in certain situations, I prefer to be aware and empowered. And I prefer to do this for others. I don't want to be told everything is fine when I ask a real question. I want an honest answer based on your opinion. So have one.

Share on Twitter or Facebook Published April 14th 2010