If you go see a medical specialist, you don't tell her what to prescribe (ok well some of you might try), or what kind of physical therapy you want. You tell her what is wrong, what feels bad and you answer her questions. You give her the information and let...

If you go see a medical specialist, you don't tell her what to prescribe (ok well some of you might try), or what kind of physical therapy you want. You tell her what is wrong, what feels bad and you answer her questions. You give her the information and let her use her expertise to tell you how she is going to fix you.

Similarly, if you go to a well known restaurant, you don't tell the chef what to prepare for you. You review the menu, listen to the specials, ask the waiter about some of the house specialties, what's fresh, etc. Or you might explain the kind of meal you are in the mood for and let your waiter make some suggestions.

You do this because you aren't the expert. You behave this way because this is how you get the good stuff. If you could remedy your own illness, or cook yourself the most amazing meal ever, you'd stay home. You venture outside your own skill set in order to take advantage of things others do more skillfully, things for which they have garnered a reputation for doing very very well.

So, next time you talk to your designer, your webmaster, your interactive agency, your marketing department, your VP of communications or (insert title of person or company you've hired to do something for you because you are not the expert and can't do it yourself) do me a favor. Make their day and don't tell them how to do what you need, just tell them why you need it. Trust me, you'll be amazed at how much better it turns out.

Share on Twitter or Facebook Published September 27th 2010